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postheadericon Dinajpur Polytechnic Institute(DPI)

 

 

Location
Fulbari Busstand Dinajpur, 5200 Dinajpur, Bangladesh
About
Welcome to One of the Biggest Polytechnic Institute in Bangladesh.3 hostels 2 for boys and 1 for girls.A big play ground and also has facilities for indoor games.1 moderate auditorium for entertainment also a canteen.
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One of the Biggest Polytechnic Institute in Bangladesh.3 hostels 2 for boys and 1 for girls.A big play ground and also has facilities for indoor games.

Faculties are :

*Computer Technology*
*Civil Technology*
*Architecture Technology*
*Electrical Technology*
*Power(Automobile) Technology*
*Mechanical Technology*
 

postheadericon Installing the Router

Installing the Router


This chapter guides you through the installation of the routers and includes the following sections:

Required Tools and Equipment

Setting Up the Chassis

Connecting the DC Power Supply

Connecting to a Network

Connecting the Console Terminal and Modem

What to Do after Installing the Router Hardware


Warning

Only trained and qualified personnel should be allowed to install or replace this equipment. (To see translated versions of this warning, refer to the document that accompanied your router.)


Required Tools and Equipment

Installation requires some tools and equipment that are not provided as standard equipment with the router. Following are the tools and parts required to install the router:

Flat-blade screwdrivers: small, 3/16-inch (0.476 cm) and medium, 1/4-inch (0.625 cm).

ESD-preventive wrist strap.

Screws to secure the rack-mount brackets to the router.

Cables for connection to the WAN and LAN ports:

Ethernet AUI cable or Ethernet transceiver for connection to the Ethernet AUI port.

Token Ring lobe cable for connection to the Token Ring port.

Serial transition cable for connection to the synchronous serial port .

Cable for connection to the ISDN BRI port.


Note For cable ordering information, refer to the section "Obtaining Service and Support" in the "Overview of the Router" chapter.


Ethernet 10BaseT hub or PC with a network interface card for connection to the Ethernet AUI (LAN) port.

Token Ring MAU for connection to the Token Ring (LAN) port.

CSU/DSU or other DCE device for connection to the synchronous serial interface.

NT1 device for ISDN BRI WAN connections, if not supplied by your service provider.

Console terminal (an ASCII terminal or a PC running terminal emulation software) configured for 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits. A terminal is required unless you are using the AutoInstall procedure. See the section "Connecting the Console Terminal and Modem" later in this chapter for instructions on connecting a console terminal.

Modem for connection to the auxiliary port for remote administrative access (optional).

Setting Up the Chassis

You can set the chassis on a desktop, install it in a rack, or mount it on a wall or other flat surface. Use the procedure in this section that best meets the needs of your network. The sections are as follows:

Setting the Chassis on a Desktop

Rack-Mounting the Chassis

Wall-Mounting the Chassis

Setting the Chassis on a Desktop

Before setting the router on a desktop, shelf, or other flat, secure surface, perform the following steps to install the rubber feet:


Step 1 Locate the rubber feet on the black adhesive strip that shipped with the chassis. (See .)

Figure 3-1 Identifying the Rubber Feet

 

 

Step 2 Place the router upside down on a smooth, flat surface.

Step 3 Peel off the rubber feet from the black adhesive strip and place them adhesive-side down onto the five round, recessed areas on the bottom of the chassis. (See .)

Figure 3-2 Installing the Rubber Feet

 

 

Step 4 Place the router right-side up on a flat, smooth, secure surface.


Caution
Do not place anything on top of the router that weighs more than 10 pounds (4.5 kg). Excessive weight on top could damage the chassis.

Rack-Mounting the Chassis

This section describes the procedures for rack-mounting the chassis. The chassis comes with brackets for use with a 19-inch rack or, if specified in your order, optional larger brackets for use with a 24-inch rack. The brackets are shown in .

Figure 3-3 Identifying the Brackets

 

 

Attaching the Brackets

To install the chassis in a rack, attach the brackets in one of the following ways:

With the front panel forward (see Figure 3-4)

With the rear panel forward (see Figure 3-5)

In a center-mount telco rack (see Figure 3-6)


Note The illustrations that follow show how to connect the bracket to one side of the chassis. The second bracket connects to the opposite side of the chassis.


Figure 3-4 Bracket Installation—Front Panel Forward

 

 

Figure 3-5 Bracket Installation—Rear Panel Forward

 

 

Figure 3-6 Telco Bracket Installation—Rear Panel Forward

 

 

Installing in a Rack

After the brackets are secured to the chassis, you can rack-mount it. Using the screws you provide, attach the chassis to the rack as shown in .

Figure 3-7 Attaching the Chassis to a Rack (Rear Panel Forward Shown)

 

 

Wall-Mounting the Chassis

Use the small brackets (for use with a 19-inch rack) to wall-mount the chassis. The small brackets provide the most stable position for the chassis.

Take the following steps to wall-mount the chassis:


Step 1 Attach the brackets as shown in Figure 3-8.

Figure 3-8 Attaching the Wall-Mount Brackets

 

 

Step 2 Attach the chassis assembly to the wall as shown in Figure 3-9, using screws and anchors that you provide. We recommend the following:

For the best support of the chassis and cables, attach the brackets so that the screws align with a vertical wall stud. (See .) This position will prevent the chassis from pulling away from the wall when cables are attached.

For the best ventilation of the chassis, mount the chassis with the power supply and fan at the top. Make sure there is clearance between the router and the wall.

Figure 3-9 Wall-Mounting the Chassis

 

 

Connecting the DC Power Supply

Some router models offer an optional DC power supply. This section describes the DC power supply specifications and wiring.


Warning

This unit is intended for installation in restricted access areas. A restricted access area is where access can only be gained by service personnel through the use of a special tool, lock and key, or other means of security, and is controlled by the authority responsible for the location. (To see translated versions of the warning, refer to the document that accompanied your router.)


DC Power Specifications

The DC power supply is intended for use in DC operating environments. lists the power supply specifications.

 

Table 3-1 DC Power Supply Specifications

Description
Design Specification

Power (input)

40W, -40 to -72 VDC

Wire gauge for power connections

14 AWG1

1 AWG = American Wire Gauge.


 

Wiring the DC Power Supply

If you ordered a router with a DC power supply, follow the directions in this section to wire the terminal block.


Warning

Before performing any of the following procedures, ensure that power is removed from the DC circuit. To ensure that all power is OFF, locate the circuit breaker on the panel board that services the DC circuit, switch the circuit breaker to the OFF position, and tape the switch handle of the circuit breaker in the OFF position. (To see translated versions of this warning, refer to the document that accompanied your router.)



Note This product is intended for installation in restricted access areas and is approved for use with 14 AWG copper conductors only. The installation must comply with all applicable codes.


Take the following steps to wire the terminal block:


Step 1 Attach the appropriate lugs at the wire end of the power supply cord.

Step 2 Wire the DC power supply to the terminal block, as shown in .


Warning

The illustration shows the DC power supply terminal block. Wire the DC power supply using the appropriate lugs at the wiring end, as illustrated. The proper wiring sequence is ground to ground, positive to positive (line to L), and negative to negative (neutral to N). Note that the ground wire should always be connected first and disconnected last. (To see translated versions of this warning, refer to the document that accompanied your router.)


Figure 3-10 DC Power Supply Connections

 

 


Warning

When stranded wiring is required, use approved wiring terminations, such as closed-loop or spade-type with upturned lugs. These terminations should be the appropriate size for the wires and should clamp both the insulation and conductor. (To see translated versions of this warning, refer to the document that accompanied your router.)

Caution
Do not overtorque the terminal block captive thumbscrew or terminal block contact screws. The recommended torque is 8.2 ± 0.4 inch-lb.


Warning

After wiring the DC power supply, remove the tape from the circuit breaker switch handle and reinstate power by moving the handle of the circuit breaker to the ON position. (To see translated versions of this warning, refer to the document that accompanied your router.)


Connecting to a Network

This section explains how to connect the router to your network. The Ethernet or Token Ring ports are used to connect the router to a LAN. The synchronous serial and ISDN ports are used to connect the router to a WAN.

The cables required to connect the router to a network are not provided with the router. For ordering information, refer to the section "Obtaining Service and Support" in the "Overview of the Router" chapter. For cable pinouts, refer to the appendix "."

Although the illustrations in this section show the model 2513 router, the procedures are the same for all of the router models.


Warning

Do not work on the system or connect or disconnect cables during periods of lightning activity. (To see translated versions of this warning, refer to the document that accompanied your router.)


Take the following steps to connect your router to a network:


Step 1 Connect the Ethernet AUI port (DB-15) to an Ethernet transceiver, as shown in . Or connect a transceiver directly to the Ethernet AUI port.


Note If your Ethernet connection requires jackscrews, remove the slide-latch assembly from the AUI connector and attach the jackscrews provided.


Figure 3-11 Connecting an Ethernet Transceiver

 

 

Step 2 Connect the Token Ring port (DB-9) to a MAU, as shown in . To ensure agency compliance with electromagnetic emissions requirements (EMI), ensure that the lobe cable is shielded.

Figure 3-12 Connecting a MAU

 

 

Step 3 If you will be using AutoInstall to configure the router, connect the synchronous serial port (DB-60) to a CSU/DSU or other DCE device, as shown in . If you do not plan to use AutoInstall (or you are not sure what AutoInstall is) do not connect the WAN cable until after you have configured the router.

If a WAN cable is connected when you power ON the router for the first time, it will attempt to run AutoInstall to download a configuration file from a TFTP server. It can take several minutes for the router to determine that the necessary files are not in place for AutoInstall to begin. For more information about AutoInstall, refer to the Cisco IOS configuration guide, which is available on the documentation CD that accompanied your router.


Note The synchronous serial port supports the following signaling standards: EIA/TIA-232, EIA/TIA-449, V.35, X.21, and EIA-530.


Figure 3-13 Connecting a CSU/DSU or Other DCE Device

 

 

Step 4 Connect the ISDN BRI port (RJ-45) to an NT1 device. (See .)

Figure 3-14 Connecting an NT1 Device

 

 

Step 5 Connect the power cable to the router and the power source.

Connecting the Console Terminal and Modem

Your router includes asynchronous serial console and auxiliary ports. These ports provide administrative access to your router either locally (with a console terminal) or remotely (with a modem).

Connecting to the Console Port

Take the following steps to connect a terminal (an ASCII terminal or a PC running terminal emulation software) to the console port on the router:


Step 1 Connect the terminal using the thin, flat, RJ-45-to-RJ-45 roll-over cable (looks like a telephone cable) and an RJ-45-to-DB-9 or RJ-45-to-DB-25 adapter (labeled "TERMINAL") included with the router. (See .)

Step 2 Configure your terminal or PC terminal emulation software for 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits.

Figure 3-15 Connecting a Console Terminal

 

 

Connecting a Modem to the Auxiliary Port

Take the following steps to connect a modem to the auxiliary port on the router:


Step 1 Connect a modem to the auxiliary port using the thin, flat, RJ-45-to-RJ-45 roll-over cable (looks like a telephone cable) with the RJ-45-to-DB-25 adapter (labeled "MODEM") included with the router. (See .)

Step 2 Make sure that your modem and the auxiliary port on the router are configured for the same transmission speed (38400 baud is typical) and hardware flow control with Data Carrier Detect (DCD) and Data Terminal Ready (DTR) operations.


Warning

This equipment is intended to be grounded. Ensure that the host is connected to earth ground during normal use. (To see translated versions of this warning, refer to the document that accompanied the router.)


Figure 3-16 Connecting a Modem

 

 

What to Do after Installing the Router Hardware

After you have installed the router, connect the power cable to the rear panel of the router and the power source and then power it ON. (If the router does not power ON, proceed to the "" appendix.)

Proceed to the next chapter, "Configuring the Router," for initial software configuration information

 

postheadericon Contact

Dinajpur Polytechnic Institute
Balubari, Dinajpur.
Phone & Fax : 88-0531-65573
email              : This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Subject List & Number of Seat at Dinajpur Polytechnic Institute

 

No

Name of Subject

Number of Seat

01

Civil

80

02

Electrical

80

03

Computer

80

04

Mechanical

80

05

Power (Auto)

80

06

Architecture & Interior Design

80

 

postheadericon Computer

The Benefits of Setting Up a Computer Network for Your Office

The benefits of a computer network comes in the form of cost savings.  Suppose you have 5 people working in your office.  Without a network, everyone will need their own printers, scanners, Internet connection and storage memory.  If you set up a computer network connecting all the computers in your office, they can all be connected through one Internet connection, use same printer, scanner and other peripherals, share files between them securely and play music stored on a network attached storage device.

Wired or Wireless Network

Your small business computer network can either be a wired connection or a wireless connection.  Both have their advantages and disadvantages.  For example, wired connections are considered more reliable and secure; however, you will need to deal with the wires.  You may have to spend money on getting the wires hidden properly behind the walls otherwise your office will start looking messy with wires all around and someone’s foot can also get trapped in those wires.  With wired connections, your computers and peripherals will also need to be fixed at one place with mobility limited to the length of the wire being used.

Wireless networks overcome most of the disadvantages of a wired network.  You don’t have to deal with wires and computers and devices can be moved anywhere in the office.   However, wireless networks are not considered as reliable, fast and secure as wired networks.  The problems with wireless networks can also be taken care of with right devices and configurations.  For eg: You can enable Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) security for your network that will allow only those with the valid WEP key to connect to the network.

Router and Network Cable

To set up a wired computer network, you will need to purchase a router and network cable.  The choice of router will be dependent upon the compatibility with your computer.  You can find out the routers compatible with your computer by going through its manual.  The network cable also called Ethernet cable or Cat5 cable will be required to connect the router, modem and computers with each other.  The length of wire that you will need will need to be calculated based on the distance between each of the computers and the router.

How to Set Up a Small Business Computer Network

Before we go into the steps of setting up the computer network for your office, we will assume that you have zeroed in on a wired network and that you have an active broadband connection in your office.  The modem provided by your ISP should already be hooked on to the cable or phone jack.

Steps to set up the network:

  1. If your computer is currently connected to the Internet, unplug the network cable from your computer and plug it into the Internet, WAN or WLAN port of the router.  If your computer is not connected, take the network cable and plug its one end into the Internet, WAN or WLAN port of the router and the other end into the modem.
  2. Switch on the router and wait till it is connected.  An active connection is generally indicated by lights that come on front the router.
  3. Connect the router and computer by plugging one end of the network cable into your computer and the other into the router.
  4. You computer should now be connected.  Repeat the same steps for all the other computers that you want to add to the network.

The above steps let you share one Internet connection between multiple computers.  Similarly printers and other devices can also be set up for sharing with your small business computer network

 
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